842 Early Action applicants admitted to Class of 2022

The Yale logo flanked by the numbers 2022

Yale College has offered admission to 842 applicants for the class of 2022 through its early action program. Dean of Undergraduate Admissions and Financial Aid Jeremiah Quinlan also reported that 55% of the 5,733 students who applied through early action were deferred for reconsideration in the spring, 29% were denied admission, and 2% were withdrawn or incomplete.

The Admissions Committee was very impressed with this year’s early applicant pool across every dimension,” Quinlan said. “We are pleased to offer admission to this first group of students in the Class of 2022, and look forward to admitting a much larger group of students through our Regular Decision process this spring.”

Earlier this month, Yale also offered admission to 52 students through the QuestBridge National College Match program. This is the highest number of students Yale has “matched” with through QuestBridge since its partnership with the organization began in 2007. On Dec. 1, these 52 students learned that they had been admitted to the Class of 2022 and qualified for a financial aid award with a $0 parent contribution. Yale’s financial aid policies ensure that parents in families with less than $65,000 in annual income — and typical assets — are not required to make any financial contribution toward the cost of their child’s education, including tuition, room, board, books, and personal expenses.

Earlier this fall, Yale announced a third set of enhancements to its financial aid policies that will benefit students from lower-income backgrounds. Starting next year, all students who qualify for a financial aid award with a $0 parent contribution will receive free hospitalization insurance coverage (previously $2,332 annually), and an additional reduction in Student Effort. These students also receive a $2,000 startup grant in their first year, and $600 supplements in subsequent years. Director of Undergraduate Financial Aid Scott Wallace-Juedes said: “We know that the cost of a Yale education extends beyond just the cost of tuition. The new start-up grants and hospitalization coverage ensure that our students with the greatest financial need have what they need to succeed inside and outside the classroom. I am proud that we are furthering our extraordinary commitment to making the Yale experience affordable for everyone.”

Pointing to both the new financial aid policies, and the expansion of the undergraduate student body, Quinlan said: “The addition of Benjamin Franklin and Pauli Murray colleges enables us to bring to Yale more students from a more diverse collection of backgrounds. The combination of expanding enrollment and greater representation of students from under-resourced backgrounds means more opportunity for more students.” Quinlan noted that the current first-year class of 2021 includes almost 100 more students eligible for federal Pell Grants than the Class of 2017.

All of Yale’s admissions offers are non-binding, and admitted students will have until May 1 to reply. The Admissions Office’s Director of Recruitment Hannah Mendlowitz said she hopes all admitted students will take the opportunity to visit Yale this winter or spring. In April, the Admissions Office will host two special programs for admitted students and their families: Bulldog Days, a 3-day/2-night open house from April 23-25; and Bulldog Saturday, a 1-day program on Saturday April 7. Both events will feature courses taught by Yale faculty, presentations by undergraduate resource centers, and events hosted by some of Yale’s hundreds of student organizations.

Campus & Community

Media Contact

Office of Public Affairs & Communications: [email protected], 203-432-1345