Yale receives $45 million for research-to-patient-care initiatives

Yale School of Medicine received a $45.4 million grant from the federal government to continue its efforts to translate medical research into patient care.

Yale School of Medicine received a $45.4 million grant from the federal government to continue its efforts to translate medical research into patient care.

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) awarded the grant, renewing its Clinical and Translational Science Award (CTSA). Yale is among 10 academic medical centers in the country to receive the CTSA renewal.

Yale won its first five-year CTSA grant in 2006. The CTSA program is aimed at speeding up the process of getting medical discoveries from the lab into the community. “Without this federal funding, some of our discoveries might never reach the people who need them most,” said Dr. Robert Sherwin, director of the Yale Center for Clinical Investigation.

Sherwin pointed to some of the successes of the CTSA program over the past five years:

  • The Scholars program which provides training and salary support for junior faculty members or postdoctoral fellows committed to careers in clinical or translational research. The 63 Scholars that have received awards since the program began in 2006, published 144 papers and received more than $50 million in independent grant funding.
  • The Office of Research Services, which has created “one-stop shopping” infrastructure to support clinical and translational research and has been instrumental in reducing the time to study initiation and easing the administrative burden on investigators
  • The creation of the Yale Center for Analytical Sciences in partnership with the Cancer Center and the School of Public Health to provide comprehensive biostatistical support for investigators
  • Substantial investments in state-of-the-art core technologies on the Medical and West campuses to carry out transformative science and advance the knowledge of basic biology and human disease
  • Purchasing and implementing a Clinical Trials Management System as part of an enterprise-wide IT initiative to integrate all of the components of clinical trial activity so that conducting research is more organized and efficient

The dean of Yale School of Medicine, Dr. Robert J. Alpern, said he is thankful to the NIH for once again putting its faith in Yale science and medicine. “The NIH understands that a large part of our mission is to fulfill the promise of laboratory research by translating it into patient treatment and cures,” he notes. “That is our ultimate goal — not just to understand the science, but to improve human lives.”

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