Former Official To Discuss Ways To Promote Good U.S.-Japanese Relations

A business networking event titled “Japan’s New Administration and the Future of Japan-U.S. Relations” will be held on Thursday, Feb. 25, at Yale.

The event is co-sponsored by the Greater New Haven Chamber of Commerce and the Programs in International Educational Resources (PIER) Executive Forum, part of the Whitney and Betty MacMillan Center for International and Area Studies at Yale.

Former Japanese government official Masaru Tsuji will be the featured speaker at the event, which will be held 5:30-7:30 p.m. in the Presidents Room of Woolsey Hall, corner of College and Grove streets.

Tsuji, currently consul general of Japan in Boston, will discuss ways to expand international business opportunities and the ways in which a good relationship between Japan and the U.S. is good for world stability and development.

Before coming to Boston, Tsuji was director general for international affairs at Japan’s Ministry of Defense. He also served as deputy director general for global issues, director of national security policy and director of international agreements at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs. He worked at the Japanese embassies in Malaysia, Singapore and Russia, and as part of Japan’s Permanent Mission to the United Nations in Geneva.

The event is part of a new series that will meet several times a year to present government, business and academic notables of interest to the public. It includes a 30-minute presentation, question-and-answer session and a networking reception. Cost is $20 for Chamber of Commerce members, $30 for non-members. Those interested must register by Monday, Feb. 22, by contacting Paul Tommaselli at 203-782-4342 or ptommaselli@gnhcc.com.

PIER strives to make Yale’s international resources available to educators, business, media and the general public. The program conducts workshops, summer institutes and film series; provides a speakers bureau and an after-school language program for the greater New Haven area teaching Arabic, Chinese and Russian, among others; and runs a large resource library. For more information, visit www.yale.edu/macmillan/pier/index.htm.

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