Academics and Policy Analysts To Discuss Major Upheavals in the Middle East

The major political, social and economic changes that have reconfigured the Middle East, and the impact of U.S. policies on the future development of the region, will be explored in a symposium at Yale on September 26 and 27.

The major political, social and economic changes that have reconfigured the Middle East, and the impact of U.S. policies on the future development of the region, will be explored in a symposium at Yale on September 26 and 27.

The symposium, hosted by the Council on Middle East Studies at the Whitney and Betty MacMillan Center for International and Area Studies at Yale University, will take place at Luce Hall, 34 Hillhouse Ave., and is free and open to the public.

Titled “Reconfiguring a Region: Opportunities and Challenges in the Middle East,” the symposium will bring together more than 20 accomplished academics and policy analysts in the field of Middle East studies.

The organizers write: “The Middle East has been of major strategic interest for the United States, and it has gained in importance since 2001. The region sits at the intersection of religious, ethnic, and political conflicts, many of them unresolved for almost a century. Events in the past year have challenged several assumptions about the policies and actions of the U.S. in the greater Middle East. We believe that a fresh evaluation of these events and their consequences from the U.S. and local points of view will be instructive not only to the participants of the symposium but also to an audience of interested students and scholars at Yale and the wider community in New Haven. We hope the symposium will contribute to a better understanding of these complex issues with significant bearing on global peace in the 21st century.”

Robert Malley, Middle East director of the International Crisis Group in Washington, D.C., will give the keynote presentation at 5:30 p.m. on September 26.

In addition, the symposium will include separate panels, each tackling a specific sub-region of the Middle East. The the end of each panel, the presenters will field questions from the audience in a closing segment.  

Yale faculty organizers of the symposium include, among others: Sulayman Dib-Hajj, neurology; Frank Griffel, religious studies; Ellen Lust-Okar, political science; and Marcia Inhorn, anthropology. For a complete program and list of participants, visit the MacMillan Center Middle East Studies Council web site.

Share this with Facebook Share this with Twitter Share this with LinkedIn Share this with Email Print this

Media Contact

Dorie Baker: dorie.baker@yale.edu, 203-432-1345

Marilyn Wilkes: marilyn.wilkes@yale.edu, 203-432-3413