Three Yale Seniors Are Honored for Courage, Character and Moral Purpose

Three members of the Class of 2002 were presented David Everett Chantler Awards during Senior Class Day exercises at Yale on March 26.

Three members of the Class of 2002 were presented David Everett Chantler Awards during Senior Class Day exercises at Yale on March 26.

The Chantler Award is given to a graduating senior (or seniors) “who best exemplifies the qualities of courage, strength of character and high moral purpose.” Judith B. Krauss, chair of the Council of Masters Committee on Awards as well as master of Silliman College and professor of nursing, presented the awards to the seniors.

The three winners and their citations follow.

Catherine Armstrong of Silliman College (one of Yale’s 12 residential colleges): “Her commitment to be a full and contributing member of any community she joins is evident in all that she does. What she is lacking in sight she makes up for in vision - whether it be in the pursuit of linguistics research or the visualization of the sweet sounds that emanate from her trumpet. She reminds us that there are many ways to see the world, and she has the admiration of all who know her for her personal motivation and everyday courage.” Armstrong is from Alexandria, Virginia, and majored in linguistics.

Sky Brosi of Davenport College: “Coming from one of the poorest counties of Appalachia and graduating from a high school that had never sent a student to an Ivy League institution, she came to Yale without many of the advantages that support success. She has demonstrated tremendous strength and courage in overcoming these and other obstacles, earning the respect of classmates and professors for her academic work and our admiration for her steadfast determination to return her gifts as a social scientist and artist to the place she calls home.” Brosi hails from Berea, Kentucky, and majored in psychology.

Matan Koch of Berkeley College: “His influence on change for practical benefit knows no bounds. As president of Students for Disability Awareness at Yale, he did more than anyone in recent memory to raise awareness about the challenges of disability. His reach extends not only to Yale and New Haven but to the higher echelons of public policy in Washington, D.C. He has our admiration and gratitude for making Yale a more inclusive community and will be a force in the disabilities community for years to come.” Koch, who is from New Milford, Connecticut, majored in religious studies.

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