Photos

John James Audubon, "The Birds of North America," 1829, R. Havell, London. (L–R) "Ivory-billed woodpecker;" "Bachman's Swamp Warbler;" "Mocking Bird, Yellow Jessamin, and Rattlesnake." Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library
Henry David Thoreau, "Handwritten draft of the concluding paragraphs of 'Walden,'" June 17, 1864, Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library
"Glacier Point, Yosemite Valley," from "Photographic views of North America," ca. 1898, Detroit Photographic Co., Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library
John Constable, "A Cloud Study, Sunset," ca. 1821, oil on paper on millboard, Yale Center for British Art, Paul Mellon Collection
Tracey Bush, "British Butterflies: Museum Box, no. 1," London, 2004, hand-cut paper specimens mounted in glass-topped box. Yale Center for British Art, Friends of British Art Fund. Bush creates artworks informed by cultures of collecting the natural world. Portions of recycled maps used to form each specimen include one or more references to the species type.
Title page from "Specimens of Sea Weed," ca. 1840, natural specimens with decorative paper and pen and ink labels. Yale Center for British Art, Paul Mellon Fund
Icaronycteris is one of the earliest known bats. This 50 million year-old fossil comes from Wyoming, where it lived during a period when high levels of greenhouse gasses allowed palm trees, tropical vines, and animals like crocodiles to survive in areas that are too cold to support them today. Yale Peabody Museum of Natural History (YPM VPPU 018150).
This fossil of a Birch leaf from British Columbia is approximately 45 million years old. Yale Peabody Museum of Natural History (YPM 21056).
Lepistosteus is a type of fish known as a gar, which still lives in parts of the United States today. This 50 million year old specimen from Wyoming choked to death on its last meal — a smaller fish whose tail can be seen protruding from the gar's mouth. Yale Peabody Museum of Natural History (YPM VPPU 022911).
Yamamoto Soken, "Birds and Flowers of the Twelve Months," ca. 1690–92, pair of six-panel folding screens: ink, color, gold and silver flecks on paper. Yale University Art Gallery, Director’s Fund; Archer M. Huntington, M.A.(HON.) 1897, Fund, Charles Stetson, B.A. 1900, Fund; and Wilson P. Foss, Jr., Ph.B. 1937, Fund. 1986.5.1.1-.2.
Martin Johnson Heade, "Jungle Orchids and Hummingbirds," 1872, oil on canvas, Yale University Art Gallery, Christian A. Zabriskie and Francis P. Garvan, B.A. 1897, M.A. (Hon.) 1922, Funds. 1971.80. An aspiring naturalist, Heade made three trips to Brazil to paint the hummingbird. His plan to publish an illustrated book was never realized, but his fascination with the birds continued unabated.
This 1808 engraving of "A View of the Fruit-trees & Fruit in the West Indies, Taken from Nature by Elizah Elwell," is by Amos Doolittle, an engraver and silversmith from Cheshire, CT, also known as the "Revere of Connecticut." Yale University Art Gallery, Gift of C. Sanford Bull. 1955.44.22.
This photo of students participating in an event at Yale Farm (courtesy Yale Sustainable Food Project), is part of the "Streams of Sustainability at Yale" exhibition at CSSSI.
Yale’s Kroon Hall uses geothermal energy to pull 55-degree water from four wells in Sachem’s Wood (photo by Robert Benson, courtesy Matt Garrett). The image is included of the "Streams of Sustainability at Yale" exhibition at CSSSI.
This photo of Sustainability Service Corps students participating in a waste audit last fall (photo by Amber Garrard, courtesy the Yale Office of Sustainability) is part of the "Streams of Sustainability at Yale" exhibition at CSSSI.
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Earth Day inspiration in Yale's Collections

In celebration of Earth Day, YaleNews invited some of the Yale collections to share images of the natural world throughout the centuries. Inspiration came in all forms from the Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library, the Yale Center for British Art, the Yale Peabody Museum of Natural History, the Yale University Art Gallery, and the Center for Social and Social Science Information, which is featuring the exhibition "Streams of Sustainability at Yale" through October. Our selection includes paintings, drawings, photographs, rare books, and ancient fossils of flora and fauna, from English cloud studies to Brazilian rainforests to prehistoric bats in Wyoming. Explore the collections online or visit Yale’s museums and libraries in person to explore.