Exhibition features scenes of Hong Kong street markets

The livelihoods and social conditions in the local street markets of Hong Kong are explored in a new exhibit at the Yale-China Association featuring paintings by illustrator Michael Sloan.

 “Michael Sloan: Paintings of Hong Kong Street Markets” features 18 works that depict portraits, street markets, and scenes of social crossroads within the Hong Kong metropolis. Sloan recently returned from a year-long residence in Hong Kong. An outdoor sketch artist, Sloan discovered commonplace nooks and overlooked settings in Hong Kong as his subjects, and portrays them in his signature style of selective coloring and detailed surroundings.

Sloan spent several years working as a printmaker in France and Italy before moving to New York City. His first illustration assignment was published on the Op-Ed page of The New York Times. Since then his drawings have been published over 100 times in The New York Times Op-Ed Letters column. He has worked for national magazines and newspapers as well as corporate and institutional clients and book publishers. Some of his regular publishers are The Wall Street Journal, Forbes, JP Morgan Chase, The New Yorker, Yale Alumni Magazine, The Christian Science Monitor, The Washington Post, and NYC Outward Bound. Sloan, who is also the creator of the “Zen of Nimbus” comic, has been awarded three silver medals from The Society of Illustrators. He also plays bass guitar in the all-illustrator jazz band The Half-Tones, performing frequently at The Society of Illustrators in NYC.

The exhibit of Sloan’s work will be on view weekdays, 2-5 p.m., through June 30, 2014 at the Yale-China Association, 442 Temple St. It can also be viewed by appointment. Signed prints and originals will be sold throughout the year, and proceeds will benefit the artist and the Yale-China Art Exhibit Series. As part of Yale-China’s mission of fostering understanding between Chinese and Americans, the Art Exhibit Series presents art and artists who explore elements, subjects, or themes inspired by Yale-China’s work at the intersection of Chinese and American culture.