Tamar Gendler appointed the Vincent J. Scully Professor

Tamar Szabó Gendler, the newly named Vincent J. Scully Professor of Philosophy, focuses her research and teaching on issues in philosophical psychology, epistemology, metaphysics, and aesthetics.

Her recent work has focused on the relations between implicit and explicit attitudes, bringing together insights from traditional philosophical work on parts of the soul with contemporary work in social, cognitive, and clinical psychology. Other work explores questions about philosophical methodology, the relation between rational and non-rational persuasion, and a range of other topics in metaphysics, epistemology, philosophy of psychology, and aesthetics.

Gendler is the author of “Thought Experiments” (2000) and “Intuition, Imagination and Philosophical Methodology” (2010), and is editor or co-editor of “Conceivability and Possibility” (2002), “Perceptual Experience” (2006), “The Elements of Philosophy” (2008) and “The Oxford Handbook of Philosophical Methodology” (forthcoming). She has been an invited lecturer at universities and conferences throughout the United States, Canada, Europe, Asia, and the Middle East.

Her popular undergraduate course, “Philosophy and the Science of Human Nature,” was filmed for Open Yale Courses in the spring of 2011. In spring of 2012, it drew nearly 350 students. Gendler also lectures for non-professional audiences in a range of in-person and online venues on topics such as human flourishing.

Currently chair of the Department of Philosophy, Gendler joined the Yale faculty in 2006 after teaching at Cornell University, where she was co-director of the Program in Cognitive Studies, and at Syracuse University. She earned her B.A. at Yale in 1987 summa cum laude with Distinction in Humanities and Math-and-Philosophy, and did education policy work for the RAND Corporation before earning her Ph.D. at Harvard University in 1996. From 2006 to 2010 she served as chair of Yale’s Cognitive Science Program. With support from a Mellon New Directions Fellowship, she was a full-time student at Yale during the 2009-2010 academic year, taking courses in neuroscience, psychology, and psychiatry.

A member of the editorial boards of a wide range of philosophy journals, Gendler has also served as the head of several committees of the American Philosophical Association. She is co-editor of the journal Oxford Studies in Epistemology.

She has held fellowships from the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation Fellowship Program in the Humanities, the National Science Foundation, the American Council of Learned Societies Ryskamp Fellowship Program, the Collegium Budapest Institute for Advanced Studies, and the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation New Directions Program.