Yale’s Reed Honored for Outstanding Nanotechnology Research

Yale Professor Mark Reed, whose research has contributed to nanotechnology in areas from quantum dots to molecular electronics, has been named a fellow of the IEEE, one of the most prestigious honors given by this professional association for the advancement of technology.

Most recently, Reed has designed a new approach for creating nanodevices that allows them to integrate directly with microelectronic systems. This novel technology has broad application for low-cost, highly sensitive detection of molecules including biomolecules for medical diagnostics and therapeutics.

At Yale, Reed is the Harold Hodgkinson Professor of Engineering and Applied Science and the associate director of the Yale Institute for Nanoscience and Quantum Electronics (YINQE). During his time at Texas Instruments before joining the Yale faculty in 1990, he demonstrated the first quantum dot device.

Reed, who received his Ph.D. from Syracuse University in 1983, is the author of more than 175 professional publications and 6 books, and holds 25 U.S. and foreign patents. His previous awards include the Kilby Young Innovator Award (1994), the Fujitsu ISCS Quantum Device Award (2001), election to fellowship in the American Physical Society (2003), and the IEEE Pioneer Award in Nanotechnology (2007).