Author Ann Beattie to Speak at Yale

Novelist Ann Beattie will read from her work on Monday, November 4, at 8:30 p.m. in the Common Room of Yale University's Byers Hall in Silliman College, 505 College Street in New Haven. Her reading, one in a series featuring authors from "The Yale Review," is free and open to the public.

Ms. Beattie's story "Coydog" appeared in the February 1995 issue of "The Yale Review." Her fiction has appeared in "The New Yorker" and she is author of many books, including "Chilly Scenes of Winter," "Falling in Place," "The Burning House," "Love Always," "Where You'll Find Me," "Picturing Will, " and the forthcoming novel, "My Life, Starring Dara Falcon." She lives in Maine with her husband,the painter Lincoln Perry.

"Ann Beattie is a sly, elegant stylist whose novels and stories have captured the strange ways Americans live in each other in a culture of eccentric obsessions," says J.D. McClatchy, editor of "The Yale Review." "We're delighted that she will be making one of her rare appearances here at Yale."

"The Yale Review" traces its history through a succession of scholarly quarterly journals, the earliest of which was founded in 1819 by a group of Yale faculty members. The modern history of the journal began in 1911, with the creation of "The Yale Review" under the editorship of Wilbur Cross. During Professor Cross's 30 years at the helm, the journal became the nation's leading university quarterly, publishing work by the best writers from around the world -- Thomas Mann, Andre Gide, Virginia Woolf, Eugene O'Neill, H.L. Mencken, and Margaret Mead, to name a few. When sociologist Kai Erikson took over as editor in 1979, he broadened the range of the magazine's interests. Under his editorship, contributors included Hortense Calisher, Seamus Heaney, Joyce Carol Oates, R. W. B. Lewis, and Adrienne Rich, among many others.

Mr. McClatchy was named editor in 1991, and continues the Review's tradition of publishing challenging literary work and a range of essays and reviews that explore the broad movements in American society, thought, and culture. Under his editorship, the Review has added Joseph Brodsky, Allan Gurganus, Lorrie Moore, Francine Prose, and Jane Smiley to its list of distinguished authors, and printed previously unpublished work by Vladimir Nabokov and Thornton Wilder.

For further information, call 203/432-0499.